With each new year comes the opportunity to form new habits and create new resolutions. On top of many resolution lists is a commitment to enhance fitness levels. While resolving to move more or get fitter is a great goal to include, and can go a long way in improving overall health and longevity, the reality is that just 8% of Americans achieve the resolutions they set for themselves.

If you find your resolve waning a bit, or even if you are still going strong, but are concerned that you can’t keep up this momentum for the long haul, here are a few tips for sticking to your fitness resolutions this year.

Be Realistic

The easiest resolutions to stick to are the ones that start out with realistic expectations. When it comes to fitness, you’re most likely to stick to a new fitness routine or commitment if the goals you set are realistic.

Think about where you started, what you hope to achieve and what you can realistically expect to do in a given timeframe and then make your resolutions accordingly. The more doable your fitness resolution, the more likely you are to feel accomplished, which will fuel you to keep doing more, rather than feeling defeated because it seems impossible to meet your goals.

Be Specific

In conjunction with being realistic about your fitness resolutions, it’s also important to be specific about what you hope to achieve, as well as how you plan to get there. Looking at a long-term goal can be daunting and can seem unachievable, but if you break your resolution into smaller and more specific goals, it’s easier to be successful and to feel empowered to keep moving forward.

Keep it Interesting

The best laid plans are only as successful as their ability to keep you interested in remaining engaged in the activity. The key is to find something you love to do, or to try different things until you do, so that you want to keep going. After all, improving fitness is all about an ongoing effort, and is not achieved with a “quick fix”.

Don’t Go it Alone

There’s strength and camaraderie in numbers. By sharing your goals and getting involved with others, you’re more likely to stick to your fitness resolutions and will hopefully find others to keep you accountable and cheer you on.

Change it Up

There’s no harm in changing your goals as needed or even adding new ones at any time. Resolutions aren’t written in stone on January 1st. They’re most likely to be accomplished if you modify them along the way to best suit your current situation.

The key is to not give up on yourself and to keep your improved health and fitness as your top priority, no matter how you wind up getting there.

Source:

http://www.statisticbrain.com/new-years-resolution-statistics/